Latest Tweets

Members Login

or  Sign in with Facebook

Get Connected!

  • Make new friends of bonsai enthusiasts from around South Africa
  • View other artist's bonsai and learn from them through commenting, asking questions and group discussions
  • Share photos and videos of your own trees and other bonsai activities
  • Hosting a club or personal event? Do it here and reach a large audience

Recent activities

  • Shayn shared a photo in Juniperus Horizontalis album
    Final
    This is my second Horizontalis since my first was stolen. All comments welcome.
    View location 3 hours 7 minutes ago
    Shayn Got a great pot from Rudi today for this tree. Will post images tomorrow for better lighting.
    15 hours 43 minutes ago
  • Bill is friends with Gary Howes
  • IMG_20150614_094018
    IMG_20150614_094107
    Found this lill critter when trying to dig up a wild olive on a farm in tulbagh.
    View location 6 days ago
  • Tyron De Beer shared 9 photos in Tyron De Beer's Photos album
    IMG_20150511_185928
    IMG_20150518_154053
    IMG_20150511_185725
    IMG_20150528_140209
    IMG_20150528_141124
    IMG_20150528_141407
    IMG_20150528_141510
    IMG_20150528_141607
    less than a minute ago
  • Hi Terry. The Japanese White Pine I have seen in Cape Town from growers, have a "cold" slightly blue tinge to them. Not the punchy green like black pine. Yet the pictures in books and websites show beautifull green trees. Why is that ?
    1 week ago
    Terry Erasmus Bill this is a good question. In South Africa we have very limited varieties in certain species. In Japan for instance there are many different sub species of Black Pine and each has slightly different characteristics. White pines are no different, there are quite a number of species and each has different qualities. I presume the white pines you have seen are all grafted and come from China. The foliage type which is grafted is the strongest type and has a sort of blue/grey colour needle. The trees in the books which you see are most likely not grafted, are a different foliage type and hence the difference in needle colour. It has nothing to do with cultivation technique or fertilizer etc.
    1 week ago
  • I suppose we can include cork bark "Oak tree" in this " cork bark forum. I have cork bark in Chinese Elm, Oak and paper bark Acasia. The problem I have is hou to bend or wire these without leaving scars.
    1 week ago
    Terry Erasmus Usually Bill, when I wire these trees its when the branch is young and has not developed cork bark yet. However if you are trying to bend something which is older then you are probably better off using stays instead of wiring loops around the branches. However this technique is very restrictive in what kinds of bends you can do. If you need to do more then I would suggest you use wire which has been pushed through airline tubing (from an aquarium store or otherwise) The tubing will cushion the wire. You could alternatively use paper, which is what they traditionally do with azaleas due to the very thin bark. However I think the latter technique will not be sufficient cushioning and will be far more time consuming.
    1 week ago
  • Hello. I move my trees to various locations depending on the weather. At the moment, the sun is so low, I have moved them exposed to get as much sun as possible. They get from first light till 3.00 PM. Question. They will be exposed to the heavy rains about to come. Will they suffer from too much water /root rot ? When they have been protected from the rain under cover, they don't get sun and I think I am guilty of under watering. Help please.
    1 week ago
    Bill Wow. A comprehensive answere. Thank you Terry.
    less than a minute ago
  • Driekie uploaded a new avatar
    1 week ago
  • Spent some time with my trees today. We had some frost in the week and just noticed that my Celtis and Natal Figs did not take it well. Black leaves are clearly an indication of frost. I've had to take them to a more protective place. It's been many years since I've lived in frost prone area. I will have to do some research.
    2 weeks ago
    tim flack Cover them with hessian in the evenings.
    2 weeks ago
  • Broadleaf evergreens.
    They are the following. Species of
    *eleagnus
    *ficus
    *jasmine
    *olive
    They are similar to Deciduous, however deciduous loose there leaves in winter.

    The deciduous category are plants like: maples, and celtis.
    The two categories above are then further broken down into:
    *alternating
    *and opposite leaf patterns.
    Pruning and ramification technique is very similar for both.
    3 weeks ago
  • For beginners.
    Bonsai is divided into 3 main categories.
    *coniferous evergreen
    *broadleaf evergreen
    *deciduous species.
    1) This is then divided further. In the coniferous evergreen category.
    elongating growth habits like Juniper, spruce and Hinoki.
    2) whorled growth patterns. Such as pines.
    3 weeks ago
  • How do you say these words?
    Shohin- show heen
    Kifu- kee foo
    Chuuhin- chew heen
    Ogata- oh gata
    3 weeks ago
  • Let's look at bonsai sizes. Many either don't know or are confused at size categories of Bonsai.
    In Japan there are 4 different size categories, measured from the top of the pot to the apex of the tree.
    *Shohin - trees below 20 cm in height.
    *Kifu- trees measuring from 21 cm up to about 30cm
    *Chuuhin- from 30 cm up to 45 cm
    *Ogata- anything larger than 45 cm. But generally in Japan they are kept to under 1.5m tall. Although the imperial collection in Tokyo there are trees that are larger
    3 weeks ago
  • tim flack shared a photo in tim flack's Photos album
    Chinese maple in development showing Autumn colours still. A beautiful mix of colour. And an idea of what's to come for this tree in the coming drawing seasons.
    Chinese maple in development showing Autumn colours still. A beautiful mix of colour. And an idea of what's to come for this tree in the coming drawing seasons.
    3 weeks ago
  • Kyle macaskill uploaded a new avatar
    3 weeks ago
  • Hi tyron , welcome to the site . I am sure you will find a good home for your bonsai .
    3 weeks ago
  • Hi Guys
    Can anyone tell me when is the last frost in the Mpumalanga area
    3 weeks ago
  • Leon is friends with Riaan Neethling
  • Some new Japanese words that are bonsai related I've learnt...
    Mekiri -candle pruning
    Hasukashi- thinning out the needles
    Metsumi -pinching out the buds
    #UselessInfoForTheDay
    3 weeks ago
  • Started with some of my new benches at our new house today. Far from done, but optimistic about the results. The property isn't ideal for benches, but over time I'm confident we will achieve what we want to. A tremendous amount of garden reshape required. We will do this over the next couple of years.
    3 weeks ago
  • Started with some of my new benches at our new house today. Far from done, but optimistic about the results. The property isn't ideal for benches, but over time I'm confident we will achieve what we want to. A tremendous amount of garden reshape required. We will do this over the next couple of years.
    3 weeks ago
  • I for one can never get enough knowledge, I've seen Bonsai Empire and Bjorn Bjoirholm have collaborated to make an online beginner course to Bonsai. It seems like a great way to learn basics, obviously some species will not grow well or at all in SA, but I think it's worthwhile the $20 enrolment fee. Check it out if you're interested. course.bonsaiempire.com/catalog/…
    It's really worthwhile. Bjorn produced a video series the Bonsai Art of Japan, free on YouTube GREAT quality.
    4 weeks ago
  • "Don't make your tree look like a bonsai, make your bonsai look like a tree!"
    4 weeks ago
    Bill Nice comment
    3 weeks ago
  • Any one with info to grow clanwillian ceder from seed ,any advice is appriciated ...
    4 weeks ago
    Terry Erasmus Dr Carl Morrow suggests in his book that this species is not suitable for bonsai. I've never tried myself but if someone with knowledge such as Carl says its not a good species then I'm not going to waste my time.
    4 weeks ago
  • Kyle macaskill shared a photo in Kyle macaskill's Photos album
    Hi tim after hours of searching fot exact tridant maple species, this was all I could find . Thankyou
    Hi tim after hours of searching fot exact tridant maple species, this was all I could find . Thankyou
    4 weeks ago
  • Kyle macaskill shared a photo in Kyle macaskill's Photos album
    Another pic of the leaves of mystery maple .....
    Another pic of the leaves of mystery maple .....
    4 weeks ago
  • Kyle macaskill shared a photo in Kyle macaskill's Photos album
    Any idea of the exact maple species? Found this growing on the farm in citrusdal, collect a few seeds, but the exact species remains a mystery.....
    Any idea of the exact maple species? Found this growing on the farm in citrusdal, collect a few seeds, but the exact species remains a mystery.....
    4 weeks ago
    Terry Erasmus I'm not sure if its necessarily a different cultivar, but perhaps I'm not understanding the meaning of the word properly. However what I can say is that maples grown from seed are almost never true to the mother plant. This means that the leaves might be a different shape, it might start pushing in spring at a different time, internodal distances might differ etc. If you for instance want to grow a forest or use the material to graft with (and you will see the leaves) then you can only use cutting material.
    4 weeks ago
  • Not really knowing pines well, I received a batch of trees which range is age from seedlings to yearlings and older. The older trees did not tolerate the transplant, which was done at the wrong...
  • tim flack shared a photo in tim flack's Photos album
    For the love of colanders.my little experimental Hinoki Cypress( I own 3 of these, absolutely adore them)this little guy has been planted in a colander with lots of LECCA and peat.ive read in countless articles and blogs that this method is used to grow Japanese Black Pines.Resulting in vigorous growth and trunk thickening.ive done this as an experiment to see how well it works. Apparently bonsai professionals like Boon Manakitivipart have used this method. Let's see if this little guy likes it
    For the love of colanders.my little experimental Hinoki Cypress( I own 3 of these, absolutely adore them)this little guy has been planted in a colander with lots of LECCA and peat.ive read in countless articles and blogs that this method is used to grow Japanese Black Pines.Resulting in vigorous growth and trunk thickening.ive done this as an experiment to see how well it works. Apparently bonsai professionals like Boon Manakitivipart have used this method. Let's see if this little guy likes it
    4 weeks ago
    tim flack I've seen a lot of info online about it, I've seen a nursery in Japan where all the pines in development are grown in colanders. Here's a link for you to read. (Luckily for you you don't need to try alternate to field growing, I saw those Tridents in your broadleaf section at your bonsaien SPECTACTULAR)
    http://bonsaitonight.com/2014/03/25/in-praise-of-colanders/
    http://muranakabonsainursery.blogspot.com/2014/04/colander-experiment.html?m=1

    plenty more out there on the topic. Thought I'd try it out and let everyone know in 6 months and then again in a year
    4 weeks ago
  • If you look carefully, you will see next to the acacia and the succulent two tiny seedlings. That's the ones I'm talking about.
  • tim flack shared a photo in tim flack's Photos album
    I've seen a few posts lately about when to repot what. Take a look at this guide from the Cape Bonsai Kai website it's been a tremendous help for me. Get a nice big notebook for yourselves and dedicate sections to your trees,whereby you make notes on what to do when. Call it a bonsai bible and every time you learn something new write it in. If it doesn't work cross it out. Put important things like when to do what.so when one day you cross over to the next place, there is instructions for others
    I've seen a few posts lately about when to repot what. Take a look at this guide from the Cape Bonsai Kai website it's been a tremendous help for me. Get a nice big notebook for yourselves and dedicate sections to your trees,whereby you make notes on what to do when. Call it a bonsai bible and every time you learn something new write it in. If it doesn't work cross it out. Put important things like when to do what.so when one day you cross over to the next place, there is instructions for others
    1 month ago
  • The one at the bottom left looks like a variety of accacia possibly. Why it takes long is that it could be that the seeds of accacia are very hard on the outside and it takes a while for them to...
  • Sean shared a photo in Sean's Photos album
    Good morning to all
    I planted these seedlings in December 2014. They only started growing two weeks ago. Any ideas why
    Good morning to all <br />I planted these seedlings in December 2014. They only started growing two weeks ago. Any ideas why
    1 month ago
    Sean If you look carefully, you will see next to the acacia and the succulent two tiny seedlings. That's the ones I'm talking about.
    1 month ago

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required